Diamonds

A Closer Look

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Traditions

A Brief History

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Settings

A Variety of Styles

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Know Your Colors

Semi-Precious Stones

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The Elements of Fashion

A tiny bit of Science

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Very soft in pure form, but strengthened when alloyed with other metals to make 10k, 14k, and 18k jewelry. Melts at 1947.52 degrees F.

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Semi-precious white metal, also soft but usually 90% pure in jewelry form. Much more affordable but tarnishes easily. Melts at 1763.2 degrees.

Pure white, dense, heavy metal, very durable, other metals not used with it due to risk of molecular contamination. Melts at 3214.9 degrees

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Usually used for water pipes and electrical wiring, when mixed with gold it gives jewelry a pink hue we call Rose Gold. Melts at 1984.32 degrees F

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Pure white metal primarily used in electroplating white gold to keep its surface bright and protected from light scratches and discoloration. Melts at 3567 degrees.

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Similar to Platinum but not as well-known, this is also used in its pure white form to make rings, and although rare, it's a bit more affordable than its cousin. Melts at 2830.82 degrees.

Popular option for men for its extreme durability, but cannot be sized, and if damaged, it can only be laser-welded. Melts at 3034 degrees.

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Light-weight, strong, scratch-resistant, gunmetal tone. Good choice for men who work with machinery, but can't be worked on by jewelers. Melts at 6192 degrees.

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Besides currency, this common metal was mainly alloyed with gold to add strength and a white hue. Recently banned in jewelry making as most people are allergic. Melts at 2651 degrees.

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First alloyed with copper in the Bronze Age, now the primary element in Pewter, with traces of copper, antimony, and bismuth. Melts at 449.7 degrees.

Common gray metal related to zinc and mercury, previously used in solder but discovered to be toxic and now banned in jewelry. Melts at 609.93 degrees.

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A gray metal alloyed with copper to make brass, often used in costume jewelry as alternative to gold. Melts at 787.15 degrees.

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A bi-product of titanium production, in crystalline form, Zirconium Dioxide is used as a Diamond substitute known as Cubic Zirconia. Melts at 3371 degrees.

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Diamonds are carbon molecules that have been reordered into a strong crystal structure under tremendous heat and pressure, resulting in the hardest material in the world.

 

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